REVIEW: GINGER SCOTT – DRUMMER GIRL

REVIEW: GINGER SCOTT – DRUMMER GIRLDrummer Girl by Ginger Scott
Also by this author: , Memphis
Published by Indie on July 30th 2019
Genres: YA, Rock Star Romance, Music
Tropes: Mental Illness Format: eARC
Source: Author
Cliffhanger: No
Goodreads
four-stars

Arizona Wakefield was a beat without a melody. Living a half-breathing life in a half-finished neighborhood with parents who always wore half-hearted smiles, the high school senior only had one thing that let her color outside her family’s perfectly drawn lines—her drums.

Jesse Barringer was a song without a chorus. The son of a washed-up rock star who’s also one hell of a deadbeat dad, he was given two things from his father—musical genius and a genetic link to the bipolar disorder that drives him mad.

One night in a garage at the end of a cul-de-sac in the middle of a bankrupt California neighborhood, Jesse’s melody found Arizona’s rhythm. An angry boy with storm-colored eyes found a blonde angel in Doc Martens with missing lines in her own story. Where her rhythm stopped, his words took over, and together, they wrote one hell of a story.

** Drummer Girl is a mature YA/New Adult romance that touches on mental health, drug abuse and includes mature sexual situations.

DRUMMER GIRL

by Ginger Scott

I’ve read quite a few books by Ginger Scott and there is only one book by her that didn’t work for me. But that’s another story and I am happy to report that she has come back as expected with flying colors. Before I continue scroll up and read the beauty that is the blurb for this book.
DRUMMER GIRL is a departure from this author’s usual sports romance. This time around music is the theme that is front and center in this mature YA story. If you think you’ve read it all, nothing can surprise you, think again. Because if there is something Ms Scott excels at it’s giving us stories that haven’t been told before. She doesn’t just polish up an old trope, no, she creates them.

Arizona is a shy young girl, playing snare drum in the school’s marching band. One day a boy moves in next door and at first it seems like they don’t have a lot in common with Jesse being the epitome of a bad boy, smoking pot, being a musician, playing hooky from school. This is the kind of boy our parents told us to run from. The deeper you dive into the plot though and the closer Jesse and Ari become, you see that this isn’t the dysfunctional relationship you’d expect. Jesse’s growth from the troublemaker who is up to no good to the person Ari can rely on is subtle but you see it. Jesse will never be a choirboy but he is an example why girls want to tame those bad boys and be THE ONE for them.

This is a slow, careful gift from a boy I find dizzyingly perfect despite all of his crazy. He doesn’t pretend to be something he isn’t. He’s a genius, he’s a wreck—he’s my first.

As you go not only Jesse’s fight with with his demons comes to light but also Arizona’s and her family’s – that was quite a twist and quite heart-wrenching

The message in this story is something we should remember in our every day life when we judge people harshly, especially people we don’t know very well. We all have something we battle, something that we don’t necessarily share with the world. Mental illnesses still have that flavor of crazy and often times people are ashamed. But we don’t choose them. And there is no shame in seeking help.

Nothing about anything in this life is normal, but maybe that’s everyone’s story. Maybe normal is the odd man out.

Ginger Scott puts the spotlight on a sensitive matter with a very delicate and tactful hand and a surprising amount of steam. She makes music and depression the background for a first love that is set to become epic. Once again this author proves what a force in YA she is and why she is one of my favorites. She writes emotional stories, full of love, sweetness and beautiful words about extraordinary people and DRUMMER GIRL just fits the mold.

I love him. I love him so fucking much. He is my lake, and I dove in head fucking first.

About Ginger Scott

I tell stories for a living. It’s a pretty great gig, actually. Each story has led to an amazing encounter, be it a new appreciation for the view from atop a polo horse to a deeper understanding of what it means to be the parent of a child with autism. I’ve told the stories of Olympians, comedians, doctors, teachers, politicians, activists, criminals, heroes and towns. You can check out a small sampling here or, heck, just Google me — my journalism work is usually under Ginger Eiden.

I published my debut novel, Waiting on the Sidelines, in spring 2013, and in August 2014, I published my fifth novel, a really raw college romance called This Is Falling. That book hit number one in teen on Amazon, and the entire adventure blew my mind! You see, this storytelling thing is my dream, the kind you wish for as a kid and pine after as you age. I took a leap to go after it, and I’m so grateful I did. I’m grateful for every single reader. And I hope to be keeping you up late at night with my words for a long, long time. I’m at 13 books and counting. I hope to celebrate 20 with you down the road.

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four-stars

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